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The 1964 North American Tour
Part 2





Part 2


 
August 23: The Hollywood Bowl, Los Angeles, California, USA
The Beatles flew from Vancouver, Canada, directly to Los Angeles for a concert at the famous Hollywood Bowl.


Set List
  • Twist and Shout
  • You Can't Do That
  • All My Loving
  • She Loves You
  • Things We Said Today
  • Roll Over Beethoven
  • Can't Buy Me Love
  • If I Fell
  • I Want To Hold Your Hand
  • Boys
  • A Hard Day's Night
  • Long Tall Sally

Odd Fact
from The Beatles and Me by Ivor Davis
"The Ambassador Hotel rejected The Beatles as unruly, so the band rented a house in Bel-Air and watched a movie at Burt Lancaster's house."
After the Beatles' watershed performances on The Ed Sullivan Show in February of that year, the group announced it would undertake its first U.S. tour.

Bob Eubanks, familiar to many as the host of The Newlywed Game from the 60s, was part of the team of deejays at KRLA, one of the top rock and pop radio stations in L.A. at the time, who undertook the task of promoting The Beatles' L.A. tour stop. Eubanks and his team got the chance after another local promoter, who was clearly more comfortable booking established showroom entertainers such as Frank Sinatra, turned the Liverpool moptops down.

"They only wanted to play the Hollywood Bowl, because of its iconic status," Eubanks, now 76 years old, remembers. "Thank you Brian Epstein for that. There was another organization — I won't name names — that tried to take the show away from me and wanted to put them into the Coliseum. Had they played the Coliseum they would have done well. But they wanted the prestige of the Hollywood Bowl."

Their fee for the night was $25,000, a princely sum half a century ago, even to a relatively high-profile entertainment-world figure like Eubanks.

"My business partner, Mickey Brown, and I owned a house together as an investment, and I convinced him it was a good idea to bring in the Beatles," he said. "So we borrowed $25,000 against the house to do that show. I couldn't get the Hollywood Bowl without the Beatles, and I couldn't get the Beatles without the Hollywood Bowl."

The fan frenzy at that show, as on all the group's other tour stops that year, has been well-documented. Yet despite the intense interest in the group, and the fact that the concert sold out quickly — "We had been told it would be impossible to sell out the Bowl in one day, but it sold out in 3 1/2 hours, without computers, without the Internet," Eubanks recalled — he said he and Brown didn't make a lot of money on that first tour stop.

"During the afternoon a busload of marshals came in, and said, 'We're here to protect the homes up above on that hill.' I said, 'That's cool. Who's paying you guys?' They said, 'You are.' One of the county supervisors thought that up," Eubanks said with a chuckle.

Eubanks also promoted the band's return visits to the Bowl in 1965 and its third and final L.A. concert on Aug. 28, 1966, at Dodger Stadium. That was the night before the final bona fide public concert of the group's career at Candlestick Park in San Francisco, after which the quartet restricted itself to the recording studio, films and special televised performances.

"Not only was it the beginning of a new era in music," Eubanks maintains, "it was the beginning of the concert business itself. I feel very blessed to be a part of that. I never take it for granted."

After the concert, The Beatles were driven to a rented mansion in the Hollywood Hills, where they had a celebratory party. A two day break from touring followed, and the band remained in Los Angeles before leaving for Denver, Colorado where they resumed the tour on August 26.

The Beatles' concert at the Hollywood Bowl was recorded by George Martin and engineers from Capitol Records, who hoped to release it as a live album. For more information on that undertaking, please see our article, "The Beatles At The Hollywood Bowl — The Lost Live Album."

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August 26: Red Rocks Amphitheater Denver, Colorado, USA
The Beatles resumed their tour on August 26, at the beautiful open-air Red Rocks Amphitheater in Denver, Colorado.


Set List
  • Twist and Shout
  • You Can't Do That
  • All My Loving
  • She Loves You
  • Things We Said Today
  • Roll Over Beethoven
  • Can't Buy Me Love
  • If I Fell
  • I Want To Hold Your Hand
  • Boys
  • A Hard Day's Night
  • Long Tall Sally

Odd Fact
"During the concert at Red Rocks Amphitheatre outside Denver, The Beatles' producer George Martin and their manager Brian Epstein climbed a gantry overlooking the stage and were struck by the band’s position in the amphitheater setting. The two men agreed the boys were easy targets for potential snipers."


The night before the Beatles landed at what was then Stapleton Airport in Denver, the police found hundreds of teenagers hiding in the bushes around the airport.

It was a frenzy.

The Beatles had only performed a handful of times in the Unites States, but half a century ago at Red Rocks, the fans there couldn't know the history they were about to see.

Nicholas DeSciose had just graduated from East High School where he was head photographer of the East High Angels.

He was 18 years old, and about to take on an assignment that would make him the envy of nearly every teenager in America.

Fresh off The Ed Sullivan Show, the band from England was about to see the majesty of Colorado's Red Rocks.

"I don't think they had the slightest idea where they were. They were put in a car, put in a tunnel in a cement room and these people came in and asked them questions," DeScoise said,

DeSciose had all access passes, even backstage, and was on stage when John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr first set eyes on the spectacular amphitheater and everyone filling it.

"All these girls were screaming and I was like, 'Whoa!'," he laughed, "It was crazy."

One of those enthusiastic fans was Linda Sue Shirkey, in the audience for her 16th birthday. The tickets were a present from her boyfriend.

Shirkey's sweetheart had saved up for weeks; the tickets were three times more expensive than an average show.

"Six dollars. Six-sixty I think," she said.

The Beatles sang 12 songs that night.

DeScoise documented it all with 13 rolls of film, each negative carefully preserved in his studio, and some cemented in history.

"I have a few pictures in the rock and roll hall of fame," he said.

"We were all kids, we were almost the same age. We were wearing the same kind of clothes, and walking down this hall. There was this huge flag and it struck us, boy would that be funny. Took a few frames of film," he said, talking about his iconic snapshot of the Beatles in America.

More of Nicholas DeSciose's photos can be seen at his Meet The Beatles For Real.

The Beatles were in Colorado, for the first and only time.

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August 27: Cincinnati Gardens Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
The next day, The Beatles played at the Cincinnati Gardens in Cincinnati, Ohio.


Set List
  • Twist and Shout
  • You Can't Do That
  • All My Loving
  • She Loves You
  • Things We Said Today
  • Roll Over Beethoven
  • Can't Buy Me Love
  • If I Fell
  • I Want To Hold Your Hand
  • Boys
  • A Hard Day's Night
  • Long Tall Sally

Odd Fact
from The Beatles and Me by Ivor Davis
"Local DJs worked out a deal to buy all the Beatles' soap, bath mats, and towels—although the boys skipped the hotel and never stayed overnight."


The long wait was over! Thousands of teenagers converged on Cincinnati Gardens 50 years ago to see the Beatles on August 27, 1964.

They came in station wagons and sedans driven by the fathers or mothers. Some rode a city bus to see the four Liverpool lads they watched on The Ed Sullivan Show in February that year.

Most were teenage girls experiencing a seminal coming of age moment: their first rock concert.

"It was, without a doubt, one of the most memorable nights of my life," said Sallie Mullinger, a 13-year-old from Mount Lookout back then.

They brought hand-drawn signs. They stood and screamed. Some fainted in the heat estimated at 115 degrees.

Few actually heard the lyrics from Paul McCartney, John Lennon, George Harrison or Ringo Starr, who did a dozen songs in about 28 minutes.

"Once the Beatles came romping out, it was complete pandemonium. You could barely hear the music in the distance, as the screaming was so loud that it just pierced your ears," said Nancy Pelzel, then a 15-year-old from White Oak.

"Everyone stood up so you couldn't see at all. Then everyone stood on their chairs," said Shirley Chaney of Union, a 16-year-old Boone County High School student in 1964. "We spent the entire concert standing on folding chairs with our ears covered. But it was all worth it to say we saw the Beatles."

"I took my binoculars. Except you can't see anything with them if you're screaming," said Karen Hughes of Over-the-Rhine, who attended as a 12-year-old with her cousin, 13, and brother, 15. "I had to stop screaming long enough to get a good look, then pass them to my cousin or brother, and then join everyone else at the Gardens screaming again."

Tickets sold out quickly after the Beatles' managers on April 10 accepted an offer from WSAI-AM DJs to play the Gardens for $25,000 during their first North American tour. Each of the five DJs — Dusty Rhodes, Paul Purtan, Mark Edwards, Steve Kirk and "Skinny" Bobby Harper — put up $5,000.

Rhodes, now Hamilton County auditor, wasn't surprised tickets, ranging from $2.75 to a whopping $5.50, vanished instantly. More than $30,000 in ticket requests were returned.

Rhonda Patrick Toich's mother took special precautions to protect her $4.75 Beatles ticket.

"Mom made me put my ticket in the freezer, so if the house burned down it would still be safe," said Toich, who was a 14-year-old Colerain Junior High School student then. The ticket is long gone — but she still has the swatch of Ringo's shirt she won through a contest in WSAI-AM's 1964 "The Beatles in Cincinnati" souvenir booklet printed after the concert.

"I am now a 64-year-old grandma, but it seems like yesterday," she said. Many arrived early to catch a glimpse of the Beatles. Carol Lowe of Reading was with a group of five 13-year-old girls who ran to the back of the Gardens when their limo arrived.

"Paul waved!" said Lowe, who still has her Beatles scrapbook, vinyl record albums, Beatles bubblegum trading cards and tickets to their Gardens ($4.50) and 1966 Crosley Field shows ($5.50). "My sons are quite impressed that their mom saw the Beatles perform twice," she said.

When Kathy Ellerman and her two friends saw their $4 seats in the far top of the arena, the 17-year-old Our Lady of Angels High School junior showed her reporter's press card for the old "Cincy Hi-Life" teen magazine to a security guard. He pointed to the press section "directly behind the stage, and we hurried there and took seats in the first row," said the Western Hills resident.

"We were so close, and it didn't matter that we were blinded by all the flash bulbs going off in front of us and made deaf by the screaming — because we were screaming just as loud," she said.

At 8:00 p.m., the show opened with the Bill Black Combo, followed by The Exciters. Then came the Righteous Brothers singing "Little Latin Lupe Lu." Nobody cared. The duo was unknown, a year before hitting the charts with "You've Lost That Loving Feeling." Jackie DeShannon followed them on stage.

"Had we not been so Beatle-crazy, we might actually have enjoyed the opening acts," said Rose Slezak Huber of Maineville, whose father drove eight kids from Middletown in a Dodge station wagon to the concert.

About 9:30 p.m., the Fab Four finally walked on stage to "a flood of screams, tears and flash bulbs. It was a thrill of a lifetime," said Bev Olthaus of Westwood.

She still has her ticket and the Gardens envelope it came in, along with a canceled check for two tickets ($11) and her handwritten notes from that night.

John, Paul, George and Ringo opened with "Twist and Shout," and closed with Paul singing "Long Tall Sally," she said.

"All we could hear were screams. But we kept saying, 'We are breathing the same air as the Beatles!' " said Lindy Kuntz Ranz of Harrison, who attended as a 14-year old with four friends and her younger sister.

One of her prized possessions is their group photo in front of the Gardens' "Beatles Tonite Sold Out" marquee.

"August 27, 1964, was the best highlight of our childhood. We still talk about it," she said.

The concert ended after just "28 glorious minutes on stage," said Beverly Beuke, a Newport native living in Delhi Township.

Outside the Gardens, fans not lucky enough to get tickets saw the Beatles hop into a limo headed for Lunken Airport.

The onlookers included Jean Wood, 34, who left her four children (ages 4-10) with her husband at their Pleasant Ridge home and bicycled to the Gardens.

"I was as excited as the kids there screaming," said Wood of Amberley Village.

"When we walked out into the night air, my ears were still ringing, and my body was just drenched in sweat … and I was very hoarse," Pelzel said.

"It was exhilarating being there. Even now, I still can't believe I saw the Beatles live!" Beuke said.

"I still think about this event in my life and consider myself very lucky," Cunningham said. "It's hard to believe it actually was 50 years ago."

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August 28 & 29: Forest Hills Tennis Stadium, Queens, New York City, New York, USA
Two sold out Beatles' shows were played here at Forest Hills on August 28 and August 29.


Set List
  • Twist and Shout
  • You Can't Do That
  • All My Loving
  • She Loves You
  • Things We Said Today
  • Roll Over Beethoven
  • Can't Buy Me Love
  • If I Fell
  • I Want To Hold Your Hand
  • Boys
  • A Hard Day's Night
  • Long Tall Sally

Odd Fact
from The Beatles and Me by Ivor Davis
"Every radio station in New York put out an all-points bulletin to find Ringo's St. Christopher medal, which had been torn from his neck in an arrival melee."


For each of these two performances, The Beatles played before 16,000 fans at the Forest Hills Tennis Stadium in Queens.

The band arrived at Kennedy Airport at 3:02 a.m.

Despite the ungodly hour, they were greeted by 3,000 fans. More awaited them at the Delmonico Hotel on Park Ave. and 59th.

Tickets went for the then-sky-high price of $6.50. An eight-foot fence, crowned by barbed wire, kept fans from the stage.

Both shows were a study in pandemonium.

The Beatles were taken to the site from Manhattan by helicopter, and took the stage at 9:50 p.m.

And very soon after, on walked four skinny guys wearing identical black suits, black boots, white shirts and black ties, their famous guitars strapped on, wildly waving and dancing around the stage.

Paul, during another intro, told the audience that he wanted them to stomp their feet. This was certainly not a well-thought out request, since the stadium was over 40 years old, and the entire rickety old wooden stadium shuddered from the pounding feet of a sell-out crowd.

The stadium was literally on the verge of collapsing.

At another point in the show, a woman in a shiny bright emerald green dress suddenly sprinted onto the tennis courts and started charging toward the stage, leaping over some of the police barricades like an Olympic hurdler and scooting around others while several cops chased after her.

She got close enough to the stage for The Beatles to notice her. In fact, George pointed her out to John and Paul in the middle of a song.

The audience picked up on her enthusiasm, and the entire crowd began cheering her on and then collectively groaning when she was finally grabbed — having not quite made it all the way to the stage.

A second young lady had better luck and managed to make it all the way to the stage. It appears as if she wanted to take George home with her.

Fortunately, such moments were rare on the tour, but when these incidents did occur, the band was definitely caught by surprise.

Those that did manage to crash the stage were quickly and unceremoniously removed by a legion of ever-present policemen.

The Righteous Brothers, the musical duo of Bill Medley and Bobby Hatfield, wanted to leave the tour after the Forest Hills' concerts. The helicopter that brought The Beatles to the lawn arrived during the Righteous Brothers set, and the noise of the rotors drowned out their music.

For the Righteous Brothers, the noise from the audience was just as deafening, and equally insulting. The whole time they were onstage, fans would be yelling, "We want The Beatles! We want The Beatles!"

Finally, both Medley and Hatfield had simply had enough.

They went to Brian Epstein and said, "Look, we're done. We're sick of this. We get paid more on the West Coast where the people know our music." So, they were graciously let out of the contract by Brian, and the duo would return to California after just one more show.

There was, however, no stopping the tidal wave of Beatlemania that was sweeping across North America, and The Beatles boarded their chartered plane and flew down the coast for their next sold-out concert in New Jersey.

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Next stop ... Atlantic City and The Beatles play Convention Hall ...



The Tour Continues







© The Beatles On Abbey Road — Posted here on September 24, 2014.











  








    






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